Posts made in June, 2015

Little Good May Come of ‘Helicopter’ Parenting

»Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in Alpha Blog | 0 comments

Little Good May Come of ‘Helicopter’ Parenting

New research by professors at Brigham Young University revealed that even additional parental warmth does not undo the negative consequences of “helicopter” parenting. Helicopter parents tend to be fixated on their children’s experiences and problems, particularly at educational institutions, be it middle school, high school or even college. Additionally, if a helicopter parent does not exude warmth, then the negative effects of the parenting style are accentuated. Such negative effects include lower self-worth and higher risk behavior, such as binge drinking. “From our past work, we thought there might be something positive about helicopter parenting under certain conditions, but we’re just not finding it,” study author Larry Nelson said. The study,...

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Accessing Your Inner Superhero

»Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in Alpha Blog | 0 comments

Accessing Your Inner Superhero

Each of us is on a journey. This journey is our story. And naturally you are the protagonist in this story, which like any story, has conflict. And no one can resolve this conflict but you. As therapist Kim Schneiderman, LCSW, MSW, writes in her excellent book Step Out of Your Story: Writing Exercises to Reframe and Transform Your Life, “nobody is going to rescue us.” While we have support from others, it’s up to us to solve the problem, navigate the challenge, make things right, cope effectively. Which can feel very scary, especially if you’re not sure that you’re up to the task, especially if you have a hard time trusting yourself. “[W]e need to access our own inner superhero to save our inner selves,” Schneiderman writes. She needed to summon her...

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The Other Depression

»Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in Alpha Blog | 0 comments

The Other Depression

Depression is a major part of bipolar disorder. We spend three times the amount of time in depressive phases than manic phases, so it’s important to be able to recognize symptoms of depression and be able to treat them effectively. Because so much time is spent in a depressive state versus a manic state, almost 70% of bipolar patients are misdiagnosed with major depressive disorder or unipolar depression in the onset of their illness. Many patients remain so, even after having a manic episode. What’s more, people who suffer from bipolar disorder are less likely to experience typical depression and more likely to experience atypical depression (AD), meaning there is even more distinction from major depressive disorder that can be recognized in order to receive...

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7 Ways to Avoid Re-Traumatizing A Trauma Victim

»Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in Alpha Blog | 0 comments

7 Ways to Avoid Re-Traumatizing A Trauma Victim

Trauma is a complex phenomenon. Many of us have probably experienced an event that we struggle to not only forget, but emotionally cope with. If I were to ask you if you have ever experienced a traumatic event what would you say? Was it severe, moderate, or mild? Was it long-term or short-term? Were you able to easily get over it? Whatever the case may be, a traumatic experience must be an event that we find difficult to cope with overtime. Sadly, many people who tend to lack knowledge about trauma fail to recognize that anything a trauma victim comes in contact with can re-traumatize them. For example, I previously had a client who witnessed his mother slit her throat and commit suicide. Prior to this suicide, the mother had been playing hiding-go-seek outside...

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The Fallacy of Unconditional Love: Why Selfless Loving Doesn’t Work & What Really Does

»Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in Alpha Blog | 0 comments

The Fallacy of Unconditional Love: Why Selfless Loving Doesn’t Work & What Really Does

Wouldn’t it be great to find someone who loves and accepts us as we are? Many times during psychotherapy sessions, my clients have uttered some version of, “I just want to be unconditionally loved! I want someone who can accept me with my flaws and foibles.” I’m very sympathetic to our desire for a partner who is not bent on fixing and changing us. As psychologist Harville Hendrix has suggested, one purpose of adult relationships is to heal old childhood wounds. A common wound is not feeling seen and accepted as we are. Love relationships can help us feel welcomed, wanted, and embraced, despite our limitations. But since others have their own set of needs and vulnerabilities, there’s a limit to what they can accept. Clinging to a demand that we be...

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